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agreement involving prepositional phrases

A verb will agree in number with the sentence's subject.

  • In the sentence, " One of the girls is counting the tickets," the subject is
    one and the verb is is. Both the subject and the verb are singular.

  • In the sentence, "Many of the girls are counting the tickets," the subject,
    many, and the verb, are, are plural.

    Notice how in these example sentences the subjects and verbs agree in
    number.

  • The design for these few buildings is intricate. (The singular subject,
    design, agrees in number with the singular verb, is.)

  • The portraits in the White House are memorable. (The plural subject,
    portraits, agrees in number with the plural verb, are.)

    Note: When you are working with the indefinite pronouns that can be either
    singular or plural (all, any, more, most, none, and some), the verb will agree in
    number with the object of the preposition in the prepositional phrase that is
    associated with the verb.

  • Some of the newspaper is missing. (Because some can be either singular or
    plural, match the verb with the object of the preposition. As newspaper
    is singular, use is [not are] as the verb.)

  • Some of the newspapers are missing. (Because some can be either singular
    or plural, match the verb with the object of the preposition. As newspapers
    is plural, use are [not is] as the verb.)
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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
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  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
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  • irregular verbs part two
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  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
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  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
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  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
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  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
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  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
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  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
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  • Precaution while using Contact Lenses

    Risk of Infection or Injury

    1Problems with contact lenses or lens care products could result in serious injury to the eye. Proper use and care of your contact lenses and lens care products, including lens cases, are essential for the safe use of these products.2 Eye problems, including sores or lesions on the cornea (corneal ulcers) can develop very rapidly and lead to serious consequences including loss of vision. 4The risk of an infected sore or lesion on the cornea (ulcerative keratitis) is greater for people who wear extended wear contact lenses than for those who wear daily wear lenses. 5The overall risk of ulcerative keratitis may be reduced by carefully following directions for lens care, including cleaning the lens case. 6The risk of ulcerative keratitis among contact lens users who smoke is greater than among nonsmokers.


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