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the noun adjective pronoun question

When is a specific word a noun? an adjective? a pronoun? Great questions!
➲ Sometimes, a noun is used as an adjective. This is true for the word gar-
den in the sentence, "The garden display attracted many visitors" since
garden describes the type of display.

➲ Examples of when a noun is a noun and when it acts as an adjective are
found in the following sentences.
Joseph left his empty glass on the table. (noun)
Joseph left his cup on the glass table. (adjective)
The ball sailed through the window. (noun)
The ball sailed through the window pane. (adjective)

➲ Sometimes, a pronoun is simply a pronoun. In other instances, it
is an adjective and a pronoun at the same time and is then called a
pronoun-adjective.

Several of the watches were expensive. (Several is simply a pronoun
since it replaces the names of various watches.)
Several watches were expensive. (Several is a pronoun-adjective that
describes the noun watches.)
Many of these computers were recently purchased. (Many is a pro-
noun that replaces the names of the computers.)
Many computers were recently purchased. (Many is a pronoun-
adjective that describe the noun computers.)
Some of the roads were repaired. (pronoun only)
Some roads were repaired. (pronoun-adjective)

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  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
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  • First Capitalization List
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  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
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  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
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  • the direct object
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  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
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  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
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  • the verb
  • The verb be
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  • types of nouns
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  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
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  • Tips to succeed in an Interview

    Finish The Interview In Style

    The last part of a good interview usually starts with the candidate asking some smart final questions. For example questions about the more overall strategy of the company, about what the interviewer considers as being crucial for being successful on the job if not covered beforehand, or if clarification is needed about the role and its specifics. Either way, you should have written down a list of both more generic and more specific questions. Three to four are sufficient If there were still more on your list towards the end of the interview, this might indicate that you were not actively enough asking questions in the interview until this point of time. It is crucial not asking your questions in a manner as being percieved as feeling obligated having to ask them. Instead they should be presented in an engaged way and you should be prepared to followupn on answers which might not be precise enough, or not having the depth you would have expected. You need to take care that all of your relevant questions will be answered during the interview. Thats your right and obligation towards yourself. If not, you might lack important information and you might join the wrong company. At the very end of the interview ask about next steps of the interview process. Personally, I also appreciate candidates who ask for a very first assessment at the end of the interview. Most important, however, and regardless of how the interview went, it is crucial to express your gratitude for the interview and to politely say goodbye.


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