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The nominative case

Nouns and pronouns (I, you, he, she, it, we, and they, to name a few) used in
the nominative case function as subjects and predicate nominatives in
sentences.

Subject examples:
Patsy read the newspaper.
I can assist you with the project.
They will be doing the least favorite part of the job.
Predicate nominative examples:
The new champion is Tony.
The new leader is he.
Their choices for club leaders are you and Juanita.
Note: In all cases, an appositive is in the same case as the word it refers to in
the sentence. Thus, in certain situations, an appositive is in the nominative
case.

We neighbors must rely upon one another. (Because we refers to the
sentenceís subject, neighbors, we is in the nominative case.)
The witnesses are we people. (Because we refers to the sentenceís
predicate nominative, people, we is in the nominative case.)
The proposalís writers, Jess and Tess, were present. (Jess and Tess are
the appositives and are in the nominative case.)

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
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  • complete and simple predicates
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  • compound subjects part two
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  • Confusing usage words part eight
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  • Quotation Marks Part Three
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  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
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  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
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  • what good writers do
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  • Mango Varieties

    Torbert

    It is sometimes incorrectly spelled Torbet or Tolbert. Semi-dwarf, juicy & colorful mango. The original tree was grown from a seed planted on the property of Tommy Torbert in Goulds, Florida. Haden was the likely parent of Torbert. Torbert was re-introduced to the United States in 1981 from a Torbert tree that had been planted in Honduras. Fruit has a round, almost spherical shape, similar to the shape of the Cushman mango. The fruit average about a pound in weight at maturity. The skin is orange-yellow in color with red blush covering much of the skin. The skin is thick and the fruit handle well. The flesh is moderately fibrous and is yellow in color. It has a mildly sweet flavor and light aroma, and contains a polyembryonic seed.The fruit typically ripen from June to July in Florida. Torberts fruit production is considered good and consistent. The trees are moderately vigorous growers.


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