cExams.net

The Colon

  • Use a colon (:) to introduce a list or series of items.
    You should have the following books and supplies with you on the
    first day of class: Roget’s Thesaurus, two pencils, a dictionary, and
    two notebooks.

    These are the eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun, adjective, verb,
    adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

    Note: A colon should not follow directly after a verb or a preposition.
    The following two sentences include incorrect uses of the colon.

    The two days of the weekend are: Saturday and Sunday.
    We saw our dog run into: the woods, the house, and the
    neighbor’s backyard.

  • Use a colon after the salutation of a business letter.
    Dear Sirs:
    Dear Madam:

  • Use a colon between the hour and the minute of time.
    It is now 4:22.
    The train is due here at 5:08.

  • Use a colon between a title and a subtitle.
    Mary Shelley wrote the novel Frankenstein: or, the Modern Prometheus.
    Did William Shakespeare write Twelfth Night: Or What You Will?
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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Healthy Juices
  • Mysterious Caves of India
  • Berlin
  • Valentines Day for Kids
  • Mouthwatering Foods to Try
  • Amazing Treehouses From Around The World

  • Most Terrifying Civilizations In the History of the World

    The Viking

    The Vikings were seafaring northern Germanic people who raided, traded, explored, and settled in wide areas of Europe, Asia, and the North Atlantic islands from the late 8th to the mid 11th centuries. Notorious for terrorizing and pillaging through Europe, they were ferocious warriors who never shied away from battle. Their physical strength was only outmatched by their skills on the battlefield and the use of diverse weapons such as axes, swords and spears. Perhaps the only civilization whose religion was also about war, the Vikings firmly believed that all people had a purpose in this life and theirs was to fight to the death. They were all you would want in a soldier and proved it on the battlefield by destroying all in their paths.


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