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Quotation Marks Part Three

This is the third of three pages dealing with quotation marks. Study these
rules, and use them in your writing.

  • When you are writing dialogue, start a new paragraph each time the
    speaker changes.

    ‘‘We need to remodel the upstairs bathroom,’’ Mom said to Dad.
    He asked her, ‘‘How much do you think that this job will cost us? I
    think that I will probably be able to do most of the work.’’
    ‘‘Great!’’ Mom replied. ‘‘Let’s talk about the project again tomorrow.’’

  • Use only the opening quotation marks at the beginning of each
    paragraph when you are quoting a passage of more than one paragraph.
    The only time to include the closing quotation marks is at the end
    of the concluding paragraph.

    ‘‘The bridge was built after the immigrants began to come into the
    burgeoning city in large numbers. This bridge was not a luxury; it
    was a necessity. People demanded it, and the politicians responded
    quickly to their demands.

    ‘‘Then the good times for construction workers began—and
    continued—for the next three decades. There was always work�
    and plenty of it. To be able to use a saw and hammer meant that
    you were able to feed your family.’’

  • Use quotation marks to enclose the titles of the following: chapters,
    songs, articles, short poems, and short stories.

    ‘‘Before Hitting the Water’’ (chapter) from Kayaking for Fitness
    ‘‘America the Beautiful’’ (song)
    ‘‘More Strain, More Injuries’’ (article)
    ‘‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’’ (short poem)
    ‘‘Beware of the Dog’’ (short story)

  • --- >>>
  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • Dictionary
  • Class 9 - Is Matter around us Pure
  • Beautiful Steps on Earth
  • Feathery Facts About Peacocks
  • Gandhi Jayanti
  • Ebola Virus

  • Economy of India

    Energy and power

    As of 2009, India is the fourth largest producer of electricity and oil products and the fourth largest importer of coal and crude oil in the world. Coal and oil together account for 66 Percent of the energy consumption of India.

    India s oil reserves meet 25 Percent of the country s domestic oil demand. As of 2012, India s total proven oil reserves of 5.5 million barrels 870 million litres , while gas reserves stood at 43,800 million cubic feet 1,240 million cubic metres . Oil and natural gas fields are located offshore at Mumbai High, Krishna Godavari Basin and the Cauvery Delta, and onshore mainly in the states of Assam, Gujarat and Rajasthan. India is the fourth largest consumer of oil in the world and imported INR726386 crore US$110 billion worth of oil in 2011 12, which had an adverse effect on its current account deficit. The petroleum industry in India mostly consists of public sector companies such as Oil and Natural Gas Corporation ONGC , Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited HPCL , Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited BPCL and Indian Oil Corporation Limited IOCL . There are some major private Indian companies in the oil sector such as Reliance Industries Limited RIL which operates the world s largest oil refining complex.

    As of December 2011, India had an installed power generation capacity of 233.929 GW as of December 2013, of which thermal power contributed 68.31 Percent, hydroelectricity 17.05 Percent, other sources of renewable energy 12.59 Percent, and nuclear power 2.04 Percent. India meets most of its domestic energy demand through its 106 billion tonnes of coal reserves. India is also rich in certain alternative sources of energy with significant future potential such as solar, wind and biofuels jatropha, sugarcane . India s dwindling uranium reserves stagnated the growth of nuclear energy in the country for many years. Recent discoveries of natural uranium in Tummalapalle belt, which promises to be one of the top 20 of the world s reserves, and an estimated reserve of 846,477 metric tons 933,081 short tons of thorium about 25 Percent of world s reserves are expected to fuel the country s ambitious nuclear energy program in the long run. The Indo US nuclear deal has also paved the way for India to import uranium from other countries.


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