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Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.


1. S1: Science means finding out how things actually do happen.
S6: But Galileo proved his point experimentally by dropping weights from the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

P: He showed that a light object falls to the ground at the same rate as a heavy object.
Q: It does not mean laying down principles as to how they ought to happen.
R: This did not agree with the views of most learned men of that time.
S: The most famous example of this concerns Galileo's discovery about falling bodies.


2. S1: I never took payment for speaking.
S6: In this way I secured perfect freedom of speech, and was warmed against the accusation of being a professional agitator.

P: The Sunday Society would then assure me that on these terms I might lecture on anything I liked and how I liked.
Q: It often happened that provincial' Sunday societies offered me the usual ten genuine fee to give the usual sort of leacture, avoiding controversial politics and religion.
R: Occasionally to avoid embarrassing other lecturers who lived by lecturing, the account was settled by a debit and credit entry, that is, I was credited with the usual fee and expenses and gave it back as a donation to the society.
S: I always replied that I never lectured on anything but very controversial politics and religion and that my fee was the price of my railway ticket third class if the place was farther off than I could afford to go at my own expense.


3. S1: Work with retarded children, in particular, involves superhuman patience and long-delayed rewards.
S6: After five years, the girl finally began to smile, when her foster grandparents entered the room.

P: Another woman faithfully spent two hours a day, five days a week, with a bed-ridden retarded girl.
Q: It was three years before the, girl made her first cut in a piece of paper.
R: The girl had never before responded to, or recognised anyone.
S: One woman decided to teach a young brain - damaged girl how to use scissors.


4. S1: It is true that we cannot bring about social equality by law and that therefore there are still inequalities in Indian society.
S6: The secular state as found in India, recognises the importance of religion to the individual by giving hi ' in freedom to practice it and tell others about it, within the limits of the Constitution.

P: In the United States of America, for instance, Negroes have equal rights under the Constitution but unfortunately these rights are not always given to them freely by the White majority.
Q: It takes time for people to change their way of thinking.
R: This is a problem common to many countries.
S: It is only when we realise that social equality means not only that men are equal before the law, but also equal in the eyes of God that we can begin to have a completely casteless society.


5. S1: Trucks, trains, planesand refrigerator ships are new ways of carrying food.
S6: And in a lonely bay, a fisherman still rows home with the day's catch.

P: In many countries, women carry food to market on their heads.
Q: High in the Andes Mountains long lines of Illamas, each with a heavy bag of grain, pick their way along rocky trails.
R: But a great deal of food is still carried on the heads of women and the backs of animals.
S: Over the desert sands, camels carry loads of salt, dates and cheese from one oasis to another.



6. S1: It was early 1943 and the war in the East was going disastrously.
S6: Boarding Party, James Leasor's latest best - seller is a record of this tale of heroics tinged with irony and humour.

P: How this unlikely bunch of middle aged civilians accomplished their missions makes fascinating reading.
Q: To stop the sinkings a spy ring had to be broken, a German ship assaulted, and a secret radio transmitter silenced.
R: U-boats were torpedoing Allied ships in the Indian ocean faster ~han they could be replaced.
S: And the only people who could do the job were a handful of British businessmen in Calcutta-all men not called out for active service.


7. S1: Much of our adult behaviour and our attitudes are determined by our upbringing.
S6: Psychologists have studied these forces in depth.

P: But the process does not stop here.
Q: In particular by the effects of that small part of society which is our family.
R: As we grow we are constantly and increasingly affected by new forces such as the social pressure of our friends and the larger world of society.
S: The family and our early life have profound effect on our later life.


8. S1: Governments are instituted among men to secure their certain inalienable rights.
S6: Such was the necessity which constrained the united colonies of America to give up thier allegiance to the British Crown and declare themselves free and independent states.

P: Accordingly, men are more disposed to suffer than to right themselves by abolishing the forms of governments to which they are accustomed.
Q: But prudence will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes.
R: They derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, and therefore, can also be changed by them.
S: But whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these rights of the people, it is their duty to throw off such a government.


9. S1: There was a time Egypt faced economic crisis.
S6: Egypt was able to sustain itself by its cotton produce.

P: Cotton is the chief export commodity 9f Egypt.
Q: Foreign trade depends on cultivation of cotton on large scale.
R: It became necessary for Egypt to boost cotton crops.
S: Only by means of increasing foreign trade Egypt could survive.


10. S1: No one knows when tea was first discovered, or how it came to be such a popular drink.
S6: It was called Cha's Ching, which, translated, means Tea Scripture.

P: By the eighth century A.D. most Chinese were drinking tea, both because they liked it as a beverage and for its medicinal value.
Q: Tea was so popular that one of the most distinguished poets of the T'ang dynasty, a man called Lu Yu, even wrote a holy scripture about it.
R: The beverage is generally accepted to have originated in China hundreds of years ago.
S: Records going back to the fourth century A.D. refer to tea.


English Test

1. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
2. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
3. Sentence Completion - Test-01
4. Sentence Completion - Test-02
5. Sentence Completion - Test-03
6. Sentence Completion - Test-04
7. Sentence Completion - Test-05
8. Sentence Completion - Test-06
9. General Elementary English Test - 01
10. General Elementary English Test - 02
11. General Elementary English Test - 03
12. General Elementary English Test - 04
13. General Elementary English Test - 05
14. General Elementary English Test - 06
15. General Elementary English Test - 07
16. General Elementary English Test - 08
17. General Elementary English Test - 09
18. General Elementary English Test - 10
19. General Elementary English Test - 11
20. General Elementary English Test - 12
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